Advent 3 Epostle-December 17, 2017

The E-postle

Advent 3, December 17, 2017

 

“The Parish of St. John the Apostle is called to be

*          A Spirited Community at the heart of Port Moody

*          transformed through the experience of the presence of Christ

*          and sent out to share God’s Love”

 

 

Re-Sponse Deanery Update

Re-Sponse is the group of dedicated individuals from deanery parishes working with the welcome and orientation of refugees in our area.  The first refugee family that the group has sponsored is expected to arrive in late spring 2018.  Currently, the deanery is engaging support for the application of a second family which is being privately sponsored.  The brother living here has committed to raising money to support a widower and four children between the ages of 3-11 as well as an adult female relative.  St. Johns, along with St. Catherine Port Coquitlam and St. Laurence Coquitlam, have agreed at parish council to support the application under the agreement holder of the Diocese of New Westminster.  Housing and funding are being covered by the private sponsor, but should money fall short of the goal, parish fundraising will help supplement.  A fundraising goal will be brought to the Annual Vestry Meeting for discussion.

The Re-Sponse group is looking for a lay person from St. Johns to help out in this important outreach and communicate with the parish.  Meetings are usually held monthly here at St. Johns on Tuesday evenings.  As well, people who are willing to give time and energy to a fundraising event in the spring are sought. For more information, speak to Jeremy Overton or a clergy or warden.

Yours in Christ, Stephanie +

Upcoming Dates

December 17- 8:30 and 10 am, the Rev. Michael Chin, preacher

December 18- 7 pm onward, Parish Council members and families welcome at Stephanie’s

December 21- 11:30 am, Christmas lunch at the St. Johns Food Bank

December 24- 10 am Advent 4 service (no 8:30 am service this day)

December 24- 7 pm & 10 pm, Christmas Eve services

December 25- 10 am, Christ Mass for Christmas Day

January 3- 9:30-noon, Coffee & Crafts in the parish hall

January 24- Group and Committee reports due to parish office for Annual Vestry

February 14- Ash Wednesday

February 18- 11:30 am Annual Vestry Meeting

February 23-25- Spiritual Formation Weekend at Loon Lake “Prayer Beyond Words”

“Prayer Beyond Words” Spiritual Retreat

The Diocese is sponsoring a weekend retreat at Loon Lake, Maple Ridge, for Anglicans wanting a deeper experience of spiritual formation and renewal.  One of the stated goals is to meet you where you are in your spiritual journey and to respond to your needs so you may better encounter God and be equipped to serve Christ.  Curious?  Talk to Stephanie or facilitators Eric ericmason@saintlaurence.ca or Pam p.mcelheran@me.com and check out the pamphlets or https://tinyurl.com/formation-feb/

Stewardship Reflection
The light of God surrounds me;

The love of God enfolds me;

The power of God protects me;

The presence of God watches over me.

Wherever I am God is!   

  • A Prayer for protection from Silent Unity

This week, ground yourself in God’s presence.  How can you share this assurance of love with others?

Budget Proposals Requested

The parish council will be preparing a draft budget for 2018 to present to the Annual Vestry Meeting.  If your group needs continued or new funding for materials or programming in 2018, please submit a proposal to our Treasurer Chelsea Belyk by January 14.

 Order of the Diocese of New Westminster

Several suggestions for recognizing individuals have been received and will be considered by parish council for our one nomination to the Bishop.  It is not too late to submit your recommendation.  See  http://www.vancouver.anglican.ca/programs/the-odnw

Prayer Cycle

In the Anglican Communion-

* Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby;  Primate of Canada Fred Hiltz and Indigenous Archbishop Mark McDonald; BC & Yukon Archbishop John Privett; Council of the North Diocese of Athabasca (Alberta)

* our partner Diocese of Northern Philippines, Bishop Brent Alawas, and especially the people of our twin church at St. Johns Mission, Bila, Mountain Province;

* Diocese of New Westminster Bishop Melissa Skelton, and this week:

The Deanery of Royal City / South Burnaby & The Rev. Gordon Barrett, Regional Dean

*The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada- National Bishop Susan Johnson, BC Synod Bishop Greg Mohr;

*In our parish:

The work of the Canonical Committee as the first draft of the Parish Profile is prepared

*The brothers and sisters who share our worship space: The Port Moody Korean Presbyterian Church and the Polish Evangelical Church.

 

Readings for Advent 4, December 24, 2017 (morning)

Isaiah 61:1-4, and 8-11; Psalm 126; 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24; John 1:6-8 and 19-28

Readings for Christmas Eve, 7 pm and 10 pm

Isaiah 9:2-7; Titus 2:11-14; Luke 2:1-20

Important Contact Information

Interim Priest– The Rev. Stephanie Shepard rev.seshepard@gmail.com or 778-773-6816

Parish Office– Karen Evans stjohn7@shaw.ca or 604-936-7762

Wardens– Geri Grigg gerigrigg@gmail.com Terry Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

Maureen Simons mesimons@telus.net or through the parish office

Treasurer– Chelsea Belyk chelsea.belyk@gmail.com

Parish Council– Adelaine Miller, Secretary adelainemiller@shaw.ca

Altar Guild– Brenda Binns Brenda.Binns@hotmail.com

St. John Prayer Circle– Sue Elliott Elliott.sue1@gmail.com

Pastoral Visiting Ministry– Joanne Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

or Alma Oldenburg almaolden@hotmail.com

Anglican Church Women (ACW) – Sue Hall 604-936-0176 sbhcat@hotmail.com

Homily for Advent 2, December 10, 2017- the Rev. Stephanie Shepard

Mark 1:1-8

St. John the Apostle

“Praying with our Minds”

May only truth be spoken here, and only truth be heard, in the name of the one, true, and living God.  Amen.

There is a tradition that John the Baptist spent years in prayer and study at the desert community of Qumran before he begins his public proclamation.  His idea that the time has come for people to repent of their sins and embrace a new life of righteousness in preparation for the Messiah doesn’t just spring out of nowhere.  A wealth of Jewish thought and theology lie behind his words.  When he preaches and teaches, he draws a multitude of people to the river Jordan.  There, they are led to understand afresh the faith of their forebears.  Many confess and are baptized.  But he tells them, “Wait.  There’s more to come.”

John urges them to continue in their journey of faith.  To live righteously: yes.  But also to keep their minds and hearts open to the revelation before them in the person of Jesus.  His finger points to the Messiah and leaves individuals to make their own decision.  He releases his own disciples to go and follow Jesus- to find for themselves what he has been prepared to understand and what he has prepared them to receive.  In the words of a recruitment poster for a theological college that I kept above my desk: “God gave you a mind and He expects you to use it!”

So when some of John’s followers transfer their loyalty to a new Master, they look to Jesus to continue the teaching.  In Luke chapter 11, verses 1-2, we read that “Jesus was praying in a certain place, and after he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, ‘Lord, teach us to prayer, as John taught his disciples.’  He said to them, ‘When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name…’”  You know the rest.  We came to know this teaching as the Lord’s Prayer.  Perhaps it was one that you first learned as a child.  Certainly is a prayer that all Christians come to know by heart.  The Lord’s Prayer has a place at the centre of our faith.  But just knowing the words isn’t enough.  It is a lifelong journey to live out what we pray in it.  And sometimes, it helps to have other words to explain it and comment on it.

It is a very Anglican understanding that our faith is informed by Scripture, tradition and reason.  Together, these three help our minds grasp what God is calling us to do and be.  And each of these are pathways we can use to help us pray with our minds.  Our Holy Scriptures give us a treasure trove of words to adapt to our personal lives.  Our heritage gives us both oral and written prayers.  And our own intelligence allows us to create and put into words the yearnings that lie within us.  We pray with our minds because God gave them to us as a means to learn and practice how to live humbly, gratefully, and peacefully.

First and foremost, we have the Holy Scriptures.  The word of God is available to each one of us, in the language of our own culture and time, as well as in the original Hebrew and Greek in which it is written.  These writings contain the story of our salvation and the record of the people of faith who have sought to understand and describe God at work in the world.  The prayerful study of scripture reveals new truths and insights.  And there are so many prayers within the pages that we can find new material every time we turn a page.  The practice called Lectio Divina involves praying a portion of the Bible, slowly reading and meditating on God’s word.  The psalms give us honest prayers of thanksgiving, lament, confession, cries for help and outbursts of anger: something for everyone!  When we do not know what else to pray, we can read an appropriate section of Scripture.  Indeed, many of the prayers we use in gathered worship are drawn directly from the pages of the Bible.

Secondly, we have a rich heritage of prayer through the Church.  Christians from the first witnesses to the resurrection of Jesus have created and collected prayers that speak to the intimate relationship we can have with our Creator, Redeemer, and Sustainer.  In the Anglican tradition, some have been brought together in successive editions of “The Book of Common Prayer”, which is exactly what it says.  The prayer book of the common people, in the common language, to be held in common when we worship.  In it are found different kinds of prayers you can use.  There are collects: prayers which gather up the community around theme or image for the time of year.  There are litanies, used to prayer for different needs in and beyond the congregation.  There are canticles- drawn from the songs of scripture and often used in musical settings in worship, such as the Magnificat, or Song of Mary.  Each of these can be used personally as well as communally.  Then there are the “big picture” prayers, such as our Eucharistic prayers, which each recount the story of salvation in the words and images that are lifted up to God.  Through our liturgy, we don’t just pray; we re-tell and re-teach who we are as God’s people.

More recently, we have the green Book of Alternative Services here in Canada to draw on, as well as many other resources from all corners of the Anglican communion, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and other denominational and Christian communities.  The flexibility of our worship allows us to use many of these within the framework of the Anglican experience to help us to pray better with fresh expressions.

But prayers are not just found in prayer books in the pews.  We have through our heritage many theologians, songwriters, poets, and mystics to inspire us in our prayer lives.  The very first book written in the English language is believed to be the “Revelations of Divine Love” written by Julien of Norwich, an account of her interior prayer life during a time of painful visions.  From Thomas Cramner to Thomas Traherne to Thomas Merton, our tradition is infused with the writings of those who sought to share their faith and experience.  And many of our hymns are a great resource for prayer.  Try singing or meditating on a favourite or one that is completely new to you!  There are also online resources to explore, from daily prayer apps for your phone to supplementary materials for the Revised Common Lectionary at Vanderbilt Library.  All around us are works that can enrich and expand our prayer lives.

Lastly, there has to be a process for making prayer our own.  It doesn’t matter how many wonderful resources are available, if we don’t make some time to incorporate prayer into our daily lives.  The discipline of praying daily is the only way that you can keep communications open with God.  In practical terms it doesn’t matter so much whether you say Morning or Evening Prayer, have set times to turn to God, or a method that reminds you in key moments to lift up your heart.  What truly matters is that prayer is a priority in your life, even for the times when you don’t feel like it.

We all have periods when we feel we are going through the motions or mouthing the words.  But the very fact that we are willing to train our minds and bodies to attend to our relationship with God is what is important.  There will be wilderness times when we feel lost and without energy, when we are not sure if anyone is listening.  But by continuing to pray, we use our minds to focus our hope on what is to come.  Advent is a season which combines our knowledge of the darkness of the world with an anticipation of what might be.  Prayer is the engine that keeps us moving through the darkness, even when we cannot see the way.  And as we pray, our minds, which are so disturbed and frightened by what goes on around us, find a peace that passes our understanding.

I want to leave you with a poem by former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, which I offer up as a prayer:

He will come like last leaf’s fall.
One night when the November wind
has flayed the trees to the bone, and earth
wakes choking on the mould,
the soft shroud’s folding.

He will come like frost.
One morning when the shrinking earth
opens to mist, to find itself
arrested in the net
of alien, sword-set beauty.

He will come like dark.
One evening when the bursting red
December sun draws up the sheet
and penny-masks its eye to yield
the star-snowed fields of sky.

He will come, will come,
will come like crying in the night,
like blood, like breaking,
as the earth writhes to toss him free.
He will come like a child.

December 2017 Update from the Canonical Committee

It has been several weeks since Bishop Melissa approved the start of the Canonical process at St. John’s. The Canonical Committee has been meeting every two weeks since the process started We would like to let you know what has been happening and what will happen in the next little while.

Progress to Date

We have:

  • Met with the Archdeacon of Burrard and Lougheed, the Venerable Phillipa Seagrave-Pride, to learn more about the process and get her advice
  • Reviewed a variety of parish profiles from other parishes
  • Reviewed the data we gathered in the parish including the results of our Lenten study and our parish survey
  • Organized a gathering of photographs to select the ones that best represent who we are to be used in the parish profile
  • Started to develop various contents for the parish profile

Results of the Parish Survey

We surveyed the parish in August and September. We are pleased to report that 65 surveys were completed. The following are the highlights of the results:

  • The new mission statement received great support. Over 87% of respondents were supportive. The mission statement was later formally adopted by parish council. Our mission statement appears in the weekly E-postle communication and is: “The Parish of St. John the Apostle is called to be a Spirited Community at the heart of Port Moody, transformed through the experience of the presence of Christ and sent out to share God’s Love.”
  • We asked parishioners what was most important in achieving the mission and the top three items were:
    • Outreach (93.9%)
    • Worship Style (93.2%)
    • Pastoral Care (89.1%)
  • We asked what should be the priorities for our buildings and the top three priorities were:
    • Accessibility was by far the top priority (scoring 8.16 out of 9)
    • Expand capacity of the worship space (5.81 out of 9)
    • Washroom on the same level as the worship spaced (5.47 out of 9)
  • One of the ways to describe the primary task of a parish (taught at the Diocesan Parish Development School) is to gather those called by God into Christ’s body, the Church, a community of transformation of mind, heart and actions, and to send these same into the world to be and to act as God’s loving and transforming presence. In the survey, we listed the various aspects of gathering, transforming and sending and asked how well you thought St. John’s did the various aspects. The survey revealed the following:
    • What we do the best: prayer and worship, greet people when they come and life in community (hospitality, food, conversation, etc.)
    • What we do well with room for improvement: study & learning, action (outreach), equipping people to live the Good News in the community
    • What we don’t do as well and could be improved: equipping people to live the Good News at home, orient newcomers to our life at St. John’s, equipping people to live the Good news at work (although many commented that they were retired so the item wasn’t relevant to them), inviting new people to church
  • We asked parishioners to select words/phrases they would use to describe our Sunday worship. The top four for each service were:
    • 8:30 am service – comforting, familiar, contemplative, contemporary within the Anglican tradition
    • 10:00 am service – family friendly, musical, uplifting, multi-generation participation
  • We asked parishioners to name the qualities/attributes/talents we should be looking for in a new priest. The top five were:
    • Inspirational leader
    • Strong pastoral gifts
    • Joyful presider
    • Thoughtful teacher
    • Wise counselor

Next steps:

  • We will continue to develop the parish profile – our goal is to have a first draft for review at the 2018 Annual Vestry meeting. The parish profile ordinarily goes through several drafts, which are presented to the parish and the diocese for input and amendment.
  • The parish profile is posted by the Diocesan office and is normally posted for a period of 6 weeks (avoiding busy seasons such as Advent, Christmas and Lent).
  • The applications come to the Bishop’s Advisory Committee on Appointments (BACA) at the closing date to select candidates for interviews (short list). Two members of the Canonical Committee will meet with BACA.
  • The Canonical Committee arranges interviews for those short-listed. If any candidate is remote, the first round of interviews is done by Skype. If there is a 2nd round of interviews, these may be held by Skype or in-person interviews. Any candidate travelling from a remote location will need arrangements made for travel and accommodation, which may take longer. If this process of interviewing reveals a suitable candidate, then a recommendation goes from the Canonical Committee to the Bishop and an offer is made. A 3-month notice period is usual for a priest leaving another position.
  • If all goes well, we hope that we can have a new priest by September 1, 2018.

Questions? Feedback?

If you have any questions or feedback, please reach out to anyone on the Canonical Committee:

Terry Walton Geri Grigg Maureen Simons
Mary Kyle Tony Pellett Ruby Ng
Teri Hazelton Natasha McDonald Sheila De Vaal

 

The E-postle – December 10th, 2017

 

Advent 2, December 10, 2017

 

“The Parish of St. John the Apostle is called to be

*             A Spirited Community at the heart of Port Moody

*             transformed through the experience of the presence of Christ

*             and sent out to share God’s Love”

 the purpose of prayer is not to change God’s mind, which always knows your wholeness and deservedness; the purpose of prayer is to change your mind so you can see through God’s eyes. – Alan Cohen

 

School for Parish  Development               

Think the Church needs more leaders?  You are right.  God’s Church needs you.  Learn confidence and skills to engage in ministry, and become one of a growing number of Anglicans committed to renewing the Church.   Speak to Stephanie or a warden about the opportunity to attend the Diocesan School for Parish Development on 4 weekends through 2018 or 1 week in the coming summer.  Bursaries and parish assistance available.  See http://www.vancouver.anglican.ca/parish-development/school-for-parish-development

 

Yours in Christ, Stephanie +

 

Upcoming Dates

December 10-11:30-12:30 pm, “How to take out Jesus: practicing home communion”

December 14- noon, ACW pizza lunch

December 18- 7 pm onward, Parish Council members and families welcome at Stephanie’s

December 21- 11:30 am, Christmas lunch at the St. Johns Food Bank

December 24- 10 am Advent 4 service (no 8:30 am service this day)

December 24- 7 pm & 10 pm, Christmas Eve services

December 25- 10 am, Christ Mass for Christmas Day

January 3- 9:30-noon, Coffee & Crafts in the parish hall

February 18- 11:30 am Annual Vestry Meeting

February 23-25- Spiritual Formation Weekend at Loon Lake “Prayer Beyond Words”

 

Update on the Interim Process

This week you will also receive an email update from the Canonical Committee.  You can soon find it posted on the church website at www.stja.ca. Paper copies are available on the table near the main entrance to the church.

 

Wherefore No WiFi in the Church Building?

As some of our more technically savvy parishioners (especially our younger ones) have noticed, there is currently no WiFi in the church building.  We do have WiFi in the Parish Ministry Centre the PMC).  We are looking for a parish volunteer to investigate the possibility of extending WiFi to the church and bring a proposal with costing and options to parish council.  Longing for connection? Speak to one of the wardens.

“Prayer Beyond Words” Spiritual Retreat

The Diocese is sponsoring a weekend retreat at Loon Lake, Maple Ridge, for Anglicans wanting a deeper experience of spiritual formation and renewal.  One of the stated goals is to meet you where you are in your spiritual journey and to respond to your needs so you may better encounter God and be equipped to serve Christ.  Curious?  Talk to Stephanie or facilitators Eric ericmason@saintlaurence.ca or Pam p.mcelheran@me.com and check out the pamphlets or https://tinyurl.com/formation-feb/

 

Cookies and More Cookies

Are you a baker?  Make a batch of cookies for the Mission to Seafarers.  Cookies should be delivered in a freezer-safe container by December 14 to a member of the ACW.  Contact Sue H.

Too busy to bake or have talents elsewhere?  Sign up after the 8:30 or 10 am service to donate $20 towards the purchase of a special box of Christmas cookies plus produce for our Food Bank clients to make their holiday bright.

Advent Wreath Making Workshop

Thank you to everyone who participated in the Advent Wreath Workshop. Thank you also for your kind donations. We collected $63 for the Sunday School Foster Child.

Free-cycling

There are a couple of larger items left from the Bazaar which are now free to a good home. If you or a person you know can use any of the following, please contact Joanne W. or the parish office this week to pick up:

– Single daybed with mattress

– Roll-away cot with mattress

– Large office chair

– Half size filing cabinet

– Dining room table

– small round oak table (needs assembly)

There is also an older television and an a.v. cart, and a large couch that need to be hauled away.

Next Steps in Reconciliation

You are being asked for feedback about possible next steps for fostering respectful relations with indigenous peoples in our area. Please speak to one of the clergy or wardens.

 

Fundraising total for Fall Bazaar

The final totals are in and we raised the amazing total of $7,121.  Thanks to everyone who participated in this event.  All your efforts, both large and small, are greatly appreciated – Ferne

 

Stewardship Reflection

“In my distress I called upon the LORD, to my God I cried for help. From his temple he heard my voice, and my cry to him reached his ears” – Psalm 18:6

When we are struggling, where do we turn for help?  What resources does God provide for our comfort and courage?  This week give thanks for the supports in your life.

 Prayer Cycle

In the Anglican Communion-

* Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby;  Primate of Canada Fred Hiltz and Indigenous Archbishop Mark McDonald; BC & Yukon Archbishop John Privett; Council of the North Diocese of Athabasca (Alberta)

* our partner Diocese of Northern Philippines, Bishop Brent Alawas, and especially the people of our twin church at St. Johns Mission, Bila, Mountain Province;

* Diocese of New Westminster Bishop Melissa Skelton, and this week:

The Anglican CanAsian Ministry (ACAM) Group

The Deanery of Richmond-Delta – The Reverend Brian Vickers, Regional Dean

*The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada- National Bishop Susan Johnson, BC Synod Bishop Greg Mohr;

*In our parish:

The work of the Canonical Committee as the first draft of the Parish Profile is prepared

and the canonical committee update is sent out

*The brothers and sisters who share our worship space: The Port Moody Korean Presbyterian Church and the Polish Evangelical Church.

Readings for Advent 3, December 17, 2017

Isaiah 61:1-4, and 8-11; Psalm 126; 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24; John 1:6-8 and 19-28

Important Contact Information

Interim Priest– The Rev. Stephanie Shepard rev.seshepard@gmail.com or 778-773-6816

Parish Office– Karen Evans stjohn7@shaw.ca or 604-936-7762

Wardens– Geri Grigg gerigrigg@gmail.com Terry Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

Maureen Simons mesimons@telus.net or through the parish office

Treasurer– Chelsea Belyk chelsea.belyk@gmail.com

Parish Council– Adelaine Miller, Secretary adelainemiller@shaw.ca

Altar Guild– Brenda Binns Brenda.Binns@hotmail.com

St. John Prayer Circle– Sue Ellliott Elliott.sue1@gmail.com

Pastoral Visiting Ministry– Joanne Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

or Alma Oldenburg almaolden@hotmail.com

Anglican Church Women (ACW)- Sue Hall 604-936-0176 sbhcat@hotmail.com

 

Sermon for Advent 1, December 3, 2017- the Rev. Stephanie Shepard

Mark 13:24-37

St. John the Apostle

“Praying with our bodies”

Abba, Father: you are the potter and we are the clay, the work of your hands.  Mold us and fashion us into the image of Jesus your Son.  Amen.

Most people come to church on a Sunday morning to find a word of hope for their lives.  This morning, we are challenged by the readings from Scripture to discover where this lies.  The prophetic speech of Isaiah 64 implores God to come down in awesome might to cleanse humanity of sin.  Then Jesus proclaims what happens when the Son of Man does appear: “the sun will be darkened, the moon will not give light, and the stars will be falling from heaven.” (Mark 13:24-25).  Stern stuff.  To find hope, we need to be alert to Christ coming into our lives.  That’s why it’s always a good idea to turn to prayer.

But who taught you how to pray?  I didn’t learn when I was a child.  I remember going up to Camp Artaban for the first time when I was ten.  On our first morning in the chapel service, the theme leader, who happened to be a priest named Ron Barnes, told us kids to close our eyes to pray.  That was a new one for me, and I had grown up in the Anglican Church! Nobody had said anything or showed us about prayer before that.  One was supposed to absorb the right way of doing things by osmosis.  In the typical Prayer Book service, there were times when everyone stood, or sat, or knelt, or crossed themselves.  In my high church parish there was a weird little bob called genuflection that we were supposed to execute when we came into or left the pew or “acknowledged” the altar. it must have been even more confusing for visitors or newcomers, as the rest of us followed the priest and hoped for the best.

I wish that someone had sat down and explained a few basics about what to do with my limbs when I am praying.  So in case you have some of the same questions I have, I want to reflect on what it might mean to pray with your body.  I would like to consider body position, praying through our bodies when we are still, disciplining the body, and using our bodies in motion as  prayer.

We start from the fact that humans are incarnational beings.  We have arms and legs and occupy a certain amount of space.  So when we enter into a quiet time of communion with God, we have to figure out where to park.   I want to clear up one misconception: no one position is “right”.  You may have been taught as a child to kneel beside the side of your bed with your hands clasped in front of you: head bowed, eyes closed.  That is one option.  There are many more.  Standing with your head and arms raised is an ancient Hebrew prayer stance.  You see a priest take this form at the prayer of consecration.  Another way to pray is to stand with your hands cupped- expectant and ready for the blessing that God will give.  Kneeling is a classic posture for prayer, signifying our humility.  You can pray lying down too, either on your back (trying not to fall asleep) or on your front (best where there is no-one likely to step on you).  Sitting in a good chair is a well-supported position for lengthy prayer sessions so that your body aches are not distracting you.  Different positions may be more suitable for different types of prayer- whether you are petitioning for someone’s healing or asking forgiveness or absorbing God’s peace and beauty.  What you choose is simply a matter of getting yourself ready to pray, and your posture is there to remind you of what you are doing.

Prayer is one of the few practices that allows us to be still without interruption.  It gets us alone to become aware of your body.  Observe your breath and your heartbeat.  Feel the tension in your shoulders or the ache in your knees.  Let the members of your physical form speak to you of what is going on in your life.  You carry a record within you of what you are struggling with and what is going well.  Your body is trying to tell you things – it is praying for you.  The physical discomfort and pain experienced is not only something that we can bring to God in prayer; it is prayer.  There will be times when you cannot concentrate on words or thoughts because of the stress that is being manifest.  Know that your body is a witness before God, and offer it up, just as Jesus did on the cross.  At the same time, remember that in the crucifixion God takes your pain and transfigures it.

There are saints in the history of our faith who have taken this an extra step.  In a belief that the body must be subdued or “mortified”, they have practiced ways of prayer that are very hard on the body.  Imagine kneeling on a cold stone floor all night in vigil, or fasting for a prolonged period to focus one’s vision.  St. Cuthbert is said to have prayed while standing in the ocean up to his knees.  At least when he got out, he had otters come and dry off his feet.

Even if you are not hurting when you start to pray, you will probably find that staying in one position is not easy after a few minutes.   Some adjustment to seek a healthy posture is good, but prayer is a discipline.  Let any other physical exercise, we built up muscles as we practice.  As we engage, our cores are literally strengthened, and you will find that your endurance will increase.  Be wise however, to discern what is the development of balance and tone and what is a warning signal from your body to get off your knees.

Lastly, we can pray with our bodies in everything we do, not just when we are still.  In fact, some of us are twitchier than others and find it hard to maintain a single posture.  There are ways to pray that engage our bodies even when they are not at rest.  There are body prayers that put us through a sequence of movements, with or without words attached.  There are spiritual disciplines that utilize conscious breathing techniques, walking mindfully, stretching, or dance.  And there are times when the task we are engaged in invites us to do it prayerfully, whether it is knitting a shawl or writing an icon.  When worship and work are one, everything we do can be a prayer offered up.  The key is keeping our awareness on the meaning behind what our bodies are doing, and giving that over to God.

In and through our bodies, there are opportunities to become connected to the One who made us in in the Divine Image.  Sometimes this comes through others, who are vehicles for God’s grace.  When we are anointed, or experience healing touch, or the laying on of hands, then we feel the power of prayer as it is transmitted through another body to ours.  At other times, we may be the ones who are the conduit of love and peace and hope.  It may be as simple as holding another’s hand, a hug, or the joy of intimacy.  This too is prayer when God is in the moment.

We are created beings, and we are made to employ our bodies to serve as we watch for the Master.  In prayer, use what works for you to stay alert to God in your life.  We have the admonition from Jesus himself: “Stay awake”.  But don’t feel bad if one day you settle down to pray with every good intention and then fall asleep.  Remember, God gives to his beloved rest.  It might be just what your body needed to continue to hope.  Amen.

 

 

The E-postle Advent 1, December 3, 2017

 

 

“The Parish of St. John the Apostle is called to be

*          A Spirited Community at the heart of Port Moody

*          transformed through the experience of the presence of Christ

*          and sent out to share God’s Love”

 

 

Prayer for  Advent      

During the four weeks of Advent, we will be exploring different ways to pray.  As we prepare for the celebration of Jesus’ birth, let’s involve our bodies and minds and hearts and spirits.  If we pay attention to these four aspects of our humanity, we are more balanced and healthy individuals.  Through them we find connection to our Creator and Redeemer and Sustainer.  What is more- a balanced and healthy community is more attentive to need and open to share the joys and sorrows of this beautiful life!

Yours in Christ, Stephanie +

Upcoming Dates

December 3- following 8:30 and 10 am services, Fall Bazaar revisited

December 7- 10:30- noon, free ‘flu shots at St. Johns Food Bank

December 10-11:30-12:30 pm, “How to take out Jesus: practicing home communion”

December 14- noon, ACW pizza lunch

December 18- 7 pm onward, Parish Council members and families welcome at Stephanie’s

December 21- 11:30 am, Christmas lunch at the St. Johns Food Bank

December 24- 10 am Advent 4 service (no 8:30 am service this day)

December 24- 7 pm & 10 pm, Christmas Eve services

December 25- 10 am, Christ Mass for Christmas Day

February 18- 11:30 am Annual Vestry Meeting

Fall Bazaar Revisited on December 3

Sunday, Dec. 3rd following the church services we will have the remaining Handicrafts and Country Store items for sale.  Our Total to date is $6,750. We are wondering if $7,000. Is possible?  Please take a moment to have a look and see if you missed a treasure the first time around.

This is also the time to mention my retirement as Bazaar coordinator.  After many years, it is time for new and creative ideas and more energetic leadership.  This is not an onerous task as there are many people willing to help but events need a leader.  I’m putting out a request to the total Parish to consider taking on this responsibility. The Bazaar is not only a major fund-raiser but it is the largest event we have that involves the entire parish community. The bazaar is always a time of fun and fellowship but also a time of deepening relationship with people that we may not always have contact with.  It would be a shame to not have it continue.  Please prayerfully consider this volunteer position. Thank you, Ferne M.

Food Bank Christmas Gift

The plan this year is to again provide a box of cookies for each family who attends the St. John’s Food Bank. Each gift will be $20 for which a tax receipt will be issued.  Your donation can be made on Nov. 26, Dec. 3, and Dec. 10 before and after each service in the church entrance (narthex). Christmas cards will be available to sign and will be attached to the cookies when being distributed on Dec. 21 at the Food Bank Christmas Dinner.  After purchasing the cookies, the extra money will be used to purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and supplies for the Food Bank.  Your gift is greatly appreciated.

 

And… Cookies for the Mission to Seafarers

If you would like to bake cookies for the Mission to Seafarers, the Anglican Church Women will take them to the Mission Dec. 14th after our ACW meeting.    The cookies should be in a container suitable for freezing and of course will not be returnable.   The Mission always has goodies out for the seafarers coming through the doors so the need is constant.   Let’s help refill their freezer.    Thank you. Sue H.

 

Stewardship Reflection

“Do all the good you can,

 By all the means you can,

            At all the times you can,

            To all the people you can,

As long as ever you can.”       –  John Wesley

 This week, how can I take a step deeper in my prayer life to “pray all the good we can”?

Advent Home Programs

Extra copies of the Advent home program to accompany your advent wreath are on the table near the doors of the church.

Financial Update

For the ten months ending October 31, 2017, the parish of St. John the Apostle has avoided a predicted $10,834 budgeted deficit, and currently has spent $387 more than it has received in income.  Although expenditures have been significantly down this year (almost $19,000), there is a recognition that the parish has to be financially ready for 2018’s coming of a new rector.

The stewardship group is pleased to report that the number of pledges received so far has increased to 66 (from 64 last year).  There is still time to reap the tax benefits by giving to St. Johns in December, and opportunity to join in God’s work for the future.  Pledge forms are available on the table near the entrance to the church or by contacting the parish office.

October           Month Budget                        Year To Date   YTD budget            YTD difference

Income            18,054             18,326                         175,017           183,254           (8,247)

Expenditures  19,571             19,410                         175,404           194,098           (18,694)

Excess income/expenses:

                           (1,517)          (1,083)                        (387)                (10,834)

 

Possible Next Steps in Respectful Relations with Indigenous Peoples

Out of the 20+ people who participated in the First Nations 101 book studies, some ideas have been generated for a further opportunity for parishioners to grow deeper in understanding and relationship with First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We could:

Invite author Lynda Gray to come speak in the parish

( see firstnations101.com )

  • Host a post-Christmas supper for the residents of the Birds’ Nest
  • Move towards territorial acknowledgment at all church gatherings
  • Write letters to Port Moody City Council to request acknowledgment of territory at Council meetings
  • Do a Kairos Blanket Exercise with the parish (for a description, go to https://www.kairoscanada.org/exercise-understanding-kairos-blanket-exercise )
  • Meet with an indigenous elder/knowledge keeper in the spring to speak about local plants and animals
  • Have a field trip to a local community event by T’seil Waututh, Kwitwetlem, Squamish, or Musquam of the Coast Salish First Nations
  • Work with the Welcome Post project towards the potlatch on June 21, 2018

(More information at www.noonscreek.org )

 

You are being asked for feedback about which of these the parish should commit to exploring.   Please speak to one of the clergy or wardens and see the posters in the parish hall.

 

Community Christmas Lunch

On Thursday December 21, volunteers from St. Johns will be serving a hot Christmas lunch to our volunteers and clients at our food bank.  Come help set up, cook, serve, or clean up and enjoy the warm food and company of this ministry.  To volunteer your time, talent, or goods, please contact Pronella D. through the parish office.

 

“Prayer Beyond Words” Spiritual Retreat

The Diocese is sponsoring a weekend retreat at Loon Lake, Maple Ridge, for Anglicans wanting a deeper experience of spiritual formation and renewal.  One of the stated goals is to meet you where you are in your spiritual journey and to respond to your needs so you may better encounter God and be equipped to serve Christ.  Curious?  Talk to Stephanie or facilitators Eric ericmason@saintlaurence.ca or Pam p.mcelheran@me.com and check out https://tinyurl.com/formation-feb/

 

Prayer Cycle

In the Anglican Communion-

* Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby;  Primate of Canada Fred Hiltz and Indigenous Archbishop Mark McDonald; BC & Yukon Archbishop John Privett; Council of the North Diocese of Athabasca (Alberta)

* our partner Diocese of Northern Philippines, Bishop Brent Alawas, and especially the people of our twin church at St. Johns Mission, Bila, Mountain Province;

* Diocese of New Westminster Bishop Melissa Skelton, and this week:

The Cathedral Chapter – The Very Reverend Peter Elliott, Chair

The Deanery of Point Grey – The Reverend Christine Rowe, Regional Dean

*The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada- National Bishop Susan Johnson, BC Synod Bishop Greg Mohr;

*In our parish:

The work of the Canonical Committee as the first draft of the Parish Profile is prepared

*The brothers and sisters who share our worship space: The Port Moody Korean Presbyterian Church and the Polish Evangelical Church.

 

Readings for Advent 2, December 10, 2017

Isaiah 40:1-11; Psalm 85; 2 Peter 3:8-15a; Mark 1:1-8

 

Important Contact Information

Interim Priest– The Rev. Stephanie Shepard rev.seshepard@gmail.com or 778-773-6816

Parish Office– Karen Evans stjohn7@shaw.ca or 604-936-7762

Wardens– Geri Grigg gerigrigg@gmail.com Terry Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

Maureen Simons mesimons@telus.net or through the parish office

Treasurer– Chelsea Belyk chelsea.belyk@gmail.com

Parish Council– Adelaine Miller, Secretary adelainemiller@shaw.ca

Altar Guild– Brenda Binns Brenda.Binns@hotmail.com

St. John Prayer Circle– Sue Ellliott Elliott.sue1@gmail.com

Pastoral Visiting Ministry– Joanne Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

or Alma Oldenburg almaolden@hotmail.com

Anglican Church Women (ACW)- Sue Hall 604-936-0176 sbhcat@hotmail.com

Advent at Home

 

Advent

Advent is the period preceding the Christmas season. It begins on the Sunday nearest November 30, the feast day of St. Andrew the Apostle, and covers four Sundays. Because the day it begins changes from year to year, so does the length of each Advent season. In 2017, Advent begins on December 3 and lasts only 22 days, because Advent 4 lands on December 24, which is also Christmas Eve!

The word advent is from Latin, and means “the coming.” For centuries, Advent has been a time of spiritual reflection as well as cheer and anticipation. Even as the Christmas season has become more secular—with advertisers urging holiday gift-givers to buy and buy some more—Advent still brings joy and the observance of ancient customs. Christian families find quiet moments lighting candles in the Advent wreath, and children use Advent calendars to count the days until Christmas.

  The History of Advent

Advent has probably been observed since the fourth century. Originally, it was a time when converts to Christianity readied themselves for baptism.

During the Middle Ages, Advent became associated with preparation for the Second Coming. In early days Advent lasted from November 11, the feast of St. Martin, until Christmas Day. Advent was considered a pre-Christmas season of Lent when Christians devoted themselves to prayer and fasting. The Orthodox Eastern Church observes a similar Lenten season, from November 15 until Christmas, rather than Advent.

Many Christians still view Advent as a season to prepare for the Second Coming of Jesus. In more recent years, however, it has also come to be thought of as a time of anticipating the Nativity, on Christmas Day.

Advent Wreaths

Advent wreaths have their origins in the folk traditions of northern Europe, where in the deep of winter people lit candles on wheel-shaped bundles of evergreen. Both the evergreen and the circular shape symbolized ongoing life. The candlelight gave comfort at this darkest time of the year, as people looked forward to the longer days of spring.

 

Later, Eastern European Christians adopted this practice. By the sixteenth century, they were making Advent wreaths much as we know them today. An advent wreath contains four candles—usually three blue and one rose. Traditionally, the candles were purple. Purple dyes were once so rare and costly that they were associated with royalty; the Roman Catholic Church long used this color around Christmas and Easter to honor Jesus.  Purple is also the colour of penitence, and so was used for both the seasons of Advent and Lent to mark preparing our hearts for His coming.

In liturgical renewal, the colour for Advent shifted to blue, to symbolize anticipation.  Now there are often three blue candles in the Advent wreath.  They are sometimes named for hope, peace, and love and are lit on the first, second, and fourth Sundays of Advent. The rose or pink candle, which symbolizes joy, is usually lit on the third Sunday.

Sometimes a fifth candle is placed inside the Advent wreath. This candle is lit on Christmas Day. White is the colour of the most holy festivals of the church year, so the “Jesus” candle is white.  Because Advent wreaths are an informal celebration, not all are the same. Others use all white candles, or replace all the candles on Christmas day with white ones (especially if the blue or purple ones are burning down by then).

A prayer can be offered during the lighting of each candle.

Tips on making an Advent Wreath

Place candles into the oasis first – the white one in the centre and the four other candles at four corners to the white one. Cut fairly short pieces of greenery and trim off excess pines/leaves from the bottom of the stem. Use the flatter greenery on the outer rim of the oasis inserting the stem in at a horizontal angle. Fill spaces in with thicker greenery also inserting at a horizontal angle. Decorate with ivy, holly and pine cones and any other trims you might like to use.  Use tall or slow burning candles and keep the greenery low on the oasis to prevent setting fire to the greenery! Never leave lit candles unattended. Keep oasis watered to ensure the longevity of the greenery.

Activities for the week of Advent 1:  Hope

Praying with our bodies

This week, pay attention to how your body feels.  Is it restless?  Go for a walk or visit a playground.  Is it bored?  Find a game or activity to play with others.  Is it tired?  Have a healthy snack or take a nap.  Try these:

When you say grace at the dinner table, hold hands with the people next to you, or raise your hands in thanksgiving.

Try a different position for prayer.  What does standing feel like?  Kneeling?  Lying down?

When you hear some music, dance to it.  Don’t worry who might be watching.

Try a new activity- yoga, t’ai chi ch’uan, stretching exercises, swimming…

A grace to use at mealtimes.  Light the 1st candle:

For food in a world where many walk in hunger,

For friends in a world where many walk alone,

For faith in a world where many walk in fear:

We give you humble thanks, O God. 

Amen.

(from the United Church of Canada)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activities for the week of Advent 2: Peace

 

Praying with our minds

 

This week, how can you draw on other people’s wisdom and your own experience to get closer to God?  There are many resources online.  Go on the web and find a site that provides daily prayer readings and meditations.  Sign up for a blog or series of podcasts.  Watch a video.

 

Keep up to speed  with the work of PWRDF through its Advent collection of daily devotions and prayers. Sign up for this free on-line resource at http://pwrdf.org/resources/seasonal

 

For a daily reflection from Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and Contemplation, go to https://cac.org/category/daily-meditations/

 

There are a variety of short videos at https://www.ted.com/topics/christianity

 

Delve into the treasury of books about prayer.  From classics like “The Cloud of Unknowing” and “Revelations of Divine Love” to modern books of Celtic prayer or indigenous spirituality to novels that move you to ponder life questions.

 

Teach a sung or spoken grace that you knew as a child to someone else.

 

Sit down with a book from the Bible, like Psalms, or this year’s Gospel of Mark, and read it reflectively.

 

A grace to use at mealtimes.  Light the 2nd candle:

 

Receive our thanks for night and day,

For food and shelter, rest and play.

Be here our guest and with us stay,

Saranam, saranam, saranam.

 

(Saranam- Refuge Grace)

 

 

 

 

 

Activities for the week of Advent 3: Joy

 

Praying with our hearts

 

This week, make an effort to bring how you feel into your prayers.  Give yourself permission to be honest before God.  You could try any of the following:

 

Put on some music.  Let it carry your desires and frustrations and longing.

 

When you feel the pressure rising, send up an “arrow” prayer for help in the moment. (Short, to the point, e.g., Dear God, give me patience!)

 

Sit down with a newspaper, radio, television or online news program.  Imagine yourself as one of the people in the situation being reported.  Say a prayer for him or her.

 

Spend some time with a friend.  Notice how she or he makes you feel and give thanks.

 

A grace to use at mealtimes.  Light the rose candle:

 

Be present at our table, Lord.

Be here and everywhere adored.

These mercies bless, and grant that we

May with our lives give thanks to Thee.  Amen.

 

(Artaban table grace)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activities for the week of Advent 4: Love

 

Praying with our spirits

 

Often we feel our words or actions are not enough.  Try experiencing prayer through one of the following:

 

Get outside.  Find a natural object- a leaf, a rock…  Spend some time holding it, examining it closely.  Wonder at the hand of God in its creation and its purpose.

 

Be creative. Make a picture or play with colours on paper. Knit or sew something.

 

Cook something for someone you love or someone you don’t get along with.

 

Sit in silence with God.  You can use a centering prayer or other discipline that keeps you open to the Divine, e.g., reminding yourself with a sacred word or phrase.

 

Light a candle.  Imagine light surrounding someone you are concerned for.

 

A grace to use at mealtimes.  Light the last blue/purple candle:

 

Our God, we are Your guests,

And ‘tis you who keeps the generous table.

We thank you.  Amen.

 

(from the Isle of Lewis)

Christmas Eve

A prayer for the lighting of the central white (Jesus) candle:

O God,
rejoicing, we remember the promise of your Son.
As the light comes from this candle,
may the blessing of Christ come upon us,
brightening our way and guiding us by his truth.
May Christ our Saviour bring life into the darkness of our world,
and to us, as we wait for his coming.
We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

The E-postle Reign of Christ, November 26, 2017

 

 

“Salvator Mundi” by Leonardo da Vinci

 

“The Parish of St. John the Apostle is called to be

*          A Spirited Community at the heart of Port Moody

*          transformed through the experience of the presence of Christ

*          and sent out to share God’s Love”

 What is the Reign of Christ?

On November 15, 2017, a painting by Leonardo da Vinci sold at auction for $450 Million U.S.  The “Saviour of the World” shows Jesus holding a crystal orb, symbolizing the world.  It doesn’t take a crystal ball to see that the world needs saving now more than ever.  But how does our liturgical celebration of the Reign of Christ fit in with the reality of our earth today?

This festival is a “Kairos moment” when past, present, and future meet.  We remember that Jesus came among us to reveal the good news of the kingdom.  We acknowledge that the living Christ is at work in the world today, and that we can choose to be part of God’s dominion of love.  We look forward to a day when justice will have full reign and the earth will be whole.

It is ironic that the picture of a king who rejected material wealth just sold for so much.  But his disciples are called to demonstrate that true richness comes from compassion and forgiveness and the truth spoken in love.  In a time of so much uncertainty, we can hold onto this mission.

Yours in Christ, Stephanie +

Upcoming Dates

November 26- Reign of Christ, Advent wreath making after 10 am service

November 27- 7-9 pm, Parish Council meeting in the PMC

November 28- 10:30-noon, “Praying with the Psalms: Thanksgiving” Tuesday bible study

December 3- following 8:30 and 10 am services, Fall Bazaar revisited

December 10-11:30-12:30 pm, “How to take out Jesus: practicing home communion”

December 14th –12:00 Pm  ACW Pizza Lunch in the Church Hall

December 18- 7 pm, Parish Council members and families welcome at Stephanie’s home

December 24- 10 am Advent 4 service (no 8:30 am service this day)

December 24- 7 pm & 10 pm, Christmas Eve services

December 25- 10 am, Christ Mass for Christmas Day

Advent Wreath Making

This coming Sunday after the 10 am service, you are invited to come and make an Advent wreath for your household.  Please bring your own candles (traditionally 1 white, 3 blue and 1 pink). Greens in the garden?  Bring them along.  Live alone?  Get some help from other parishioners to make a memorable centerpiece.

Fall Bazaar on December 3 and Beyond

Fall Bazaar Revisited:  Sunday, Dec. 3rd following the church services we will have the remaining Handicrafts and Country Store items for sale.  Our Total to date is $6,750. We are wondering if $7,000. Is possible?  Please take a moment to have a look and see if you missed a treasure the first time around.

I would like to thank all the volunteers this year for their support that made my job so much easier but a special Thank-you to Joanne Walton, Brenda Binns, Sylvia Bradley and Mel Moore just to mention a few.  You went above and beyond!

This is also the time to mention my retirement as Bazaar coordinator.  After many years, it is time for new and creative ideas and more energetic leadership.  This is not an onerous task as there are many people willing to help but events need a leader.  I’m putting out a request to the total Parish to consider taking on this responsibility. The Bazaar is not only a major fund-raiser but it is the largest event we have that involves the entire parish community. The bazaar is always a time of fun and fellowship but also a time of deepening relationship with people that we may not always have contact with.  It would be a shame to not have it continue.  Please prayerfully consider this volunteer position.

 

Ferne Malcolm

 

Protect You and Your Loved Ones this ‘Flu Season

On Thursday December 7, a public health nurse from Fraser Health will be returning to St. Johns to offer free vaccinations against this year’s strains of influenza.  If you have not yet got your ‘flu shot, come to the Food Bank between 10 am and noon to get a preventative poke.  This is especially advised for those who are in contact with children or seniors, or who visit care homes.

 

Food Bank Christmas Gift

The plan this year is to again provide a box of cookies for each family who attends the St. John’s Food Bank. Each gift will be $20 for which a tax receipt will be issued.  Your donation can be made on Nov. 26, Dec. 3, and Dec. 10 before and after each service in the church entrance (narthex). Christmas cards will be available to sign and will be attached to the cookies when being distributed on Dec. 21 at the Food Bank Christmas Dinner.  After purchasing the cookies, the extra money will be used to purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and supplies for the Food Bank.  Your gift is greatly appreciated.

 

Nominations Wanted for the Order of the Diocese of New Westminster

St. Johns has many saints.  Is there someone who stands out for you in the service she or he has given over the years to further the gospel? Nominate this individual for the highest lay honour in the Anglican Church: the ODNW.  For more information, go to http://www.vancouver.anglican.ca/programs/the-odnw then get the information in to Parish Council for consideration.

 

Myanmar Crisis Relief Fund Effort through P.W.R.D.F.

The Government of Canada will match donations 1:1 through its Rohingya Myanmar Relief Fund when you donate to the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund before November 28th. Go to www.pwrdf.org/donate to help the refugees fleeing into Bangladesh in this humanitarian crisis.

Advent Silent Day

An Advent “Taste of Silence” Retreat- Saturday December 2nd at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 110 Gladwin Drive, North Vancouver.  You are invited to a personal retreat daya as we enter this sacred time of year.  This is a setting that encourages inner solitude and inner silence as the focus is on a personal relationship with the Divine.  Information available at www.cogv.org or the registrar Christine at chris.kesans@gmail.com

 

Stewardship Reflection

“Good service takes selflessness. It means setting aside what you might prefer to do and giving attention to the needs of others.”        – from the book Making Love Happen.

 

Sometimes in responding to a need, we find a fulfilment that surprises us.  Duty is magically transformed into joy when we see the effect our help has for another.  This week, notice the effect your service has on the one you are helping, for in his or her smile you see Christ.

 

Thanks this week to all who bring greenery and help with the Advent wreath making after the 10 am service on Sunday November 26.

 

ACW Pizza Lunch- Thursday December 14th – 12:00 PM

We will be preparing goodie baskets for our seniors. Please bring home baked treats. Any items left over will be donated to the Mission to Seafarers. Cost for lunch $10.00

 

Prayer Cycle

In the Anglican Communion- Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby;

Primate of Canada Fred Hiltz and Indigenous Archbishop Mark McDonald;

BC & Yukon Archbishop John Privett;

 

The Diocese of Caledonia and the Haida, Nisgaa, Gitsan, and Tsminian Nations

 

our partner Diocese of Northern Philippines, Bishop Brent Alawas, and especially the people of our twin church at St. Johns Mission, Bila, Mountain Province;

 

Diocese of New Westminster Bishop Melissa Skelton, and this week:

Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver -The Very Rev. Peter Elliott, Dean,

The Revs. Marnie Peterson, Dixie Black, Alisdair Smith, Ross Bliss, Helen Dunn, Jeffrey Preiss

Christ Church, Hope – The Rev. Allan Carson

         St. Andrew, Langley – The Revs. Helen Tervo, Helen Lingham

 

In our parish:

The work of the Canonical Committee as it prepares a first draft of the Parish Profile

 

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada- Nat. Bis. Susan Johnson, BC Synod Bis. Greg Mohr;

The brothers and sisters who share our worship space: The Port Moody Korean Presbyterian Church and the Polish Evangelical Church.

 

Readings for Advent 1, December 3, 2017

Isaiah 64:1-9; Psalm 80; 1 Corinthians 1:3-9; Mark 13:24-37

 

Important Contact Information

Interim Priest– The Rev. Stephanie Shepard rev.seshepard@gmail.com or 778-773-6816

Parish Office– Karen Evans stjohn7@shaw.ca or 604-936-7762

Wardens– Geri Grigg gerigrigg@gmail.com Terry Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

Maureen Simons mesimons@telus.net or through the parish office

Treasurer– Chelsea Belyk chelsea.belyk@gmail.com

Parish Council– Adelaine Miller, Secretary adelainemiller@shaw.ca

Altar Guild– Brenda Binns Brenda.Binns@hotmail.com

St. John Prayer Circle– Sue Ellliott Elliott.sue1@gmail.com

Pastoral Visiting Ministry– Joanne Walton terry&joanne_walton@telus.net

or Alma Oldenburg almaolden@hotmail.com

Anglican Church Women (ACW)- Sue Hall 604-936-0176 sbhcat@hotmail.com

Fall Bazaar Revisited:  Sunday, Dec. 3rd

Fall Bazaar Revisited:  Sunday, Dec. 3rd following the church services we will have the remaining Handicrafts and Country Store items for sale.  Our Total to date is $6,750. We are wondering if $7,000. Is possible?  Please take a moment to have a look and see if you missed a treasure the first time around.

I would like to thank all the volunteers this year for their support that made my job so much easier but a special Thank You  to Joanne Walton, Brenda Binns, Sylvia Bradley and Mel Moore just to mention a few.  You went above and beyond!

This is also the time to mention my retirement as Bazaar coordinator.  After many years it is time for new and creative ideas and more energetic leadership.  This is not an onerous task as there are many people willing to help but events need a leader.  I’m putting out a request to the total Parish to consider taking on this responsibility. The Bazaar is not only a major fund raiser but it is the largest event we have that involves the entire parish community. The bazaar is always a time of fun and fellowship but also a time of deepening relationship with people that we may not always have contact with.  It would be a shame to not have it continue.  Please prayerfully consider this volunteer position.

Ferne Malcolm