Funerals and Ministry at time of Death

Death confronts us in the depths of our being. It is a momentous and intimidating event, and can leave us disoriented and afraid. It is important to find ways of approaching death that allow us to acknowledge it, accept it, and move forward in hope.

From the perspective of faith, dying can be a beautiful and meaningful transition, an opening to new life. The clergy are always willing to be with someone who is dying, to offer prayer and hope, and to offer a loving and steady presence at a difficult and often frightening time. We will come to either home or hospital and offer “Last Rites,” or prayers for the dying (and for those trying to cope with the loss).

It has been the practice of the Christian Church for many centuries to gather at the time of death in order to reflect and commemorate, to commiserate and comfort, and to express our hope and faith that “in Christ shall all be made alive.” A funeral service (or memorial) is an opportunity for reflection, thanksgiving, prayer, and mutual support, a time to be reassured and upheld by the spiritual resources of the Christian faith.

Meeting with Clergy

Grief can be overwhelming, and in addition, people are often swamped by a multitude of tasks that need to be done. Family conflicts can become a factor. People can become very stressed, and making good decisions can become difficult. The clergy can provide a steady, calm and mediating presence in the midst of the chaos and offer a helpful perspective on things, and we are glad to be there for you at such difficult times.

Typically, families are immediately in touch with one of the funeral homes to deal with practical matters relating to the transport and care of the body, and details about obituary, flowers, cards, etc. However, please notify the Rector as soon as possible (604-936-7762) of a death and request for service.

The Rector (the Rev. Grant Rodgers) will want to meet with the family to offer support, and to plan for the service.